A Mountain Walked

A Mountain Walked

Product Description
H. P. Lovecraft wrote The Call of Cthulhu in 1926, initiating the Cthulhu Mythos, one of the most widely imitated shared-world universes in weird fiction. Even in his lifetime, many other writers added to the Mythos, and after his death hundreds if not thousands of authors of weird, fantasy, and science fiction have added their distinctive elaborations on Lovecraft s basic themes and ideas.

This volume features some of the best Cthulhu Mythos writing over the past century. Beginning with such rare but classic stories as Mearle Prout s The House of the Worm and Robert Barbour Johnson s Far Below, from the pages of Weird Tales, the anthology moves on to James Wade s novella The Deep Ones and Ramsey Campbell s refreshing riff on the forbidden book motif, The Franklyn Paragraphs. Acclaimed stories by T. E. D. Klein, Thomas Ligotti, Neil Gaiman, and W. H. Pugmire are also included.

The book includes an array of original stories by such leading authors of Lovecraftian fiction as Caitlín R. Kiernan, Joseph S. Pulver, Sr., Donald Tyson, Cody Goodfellow, and Michael Shea. Gemma Files contributes a richly textured novella, while Jonathan Thomas offers a story full of his distinctive melding of horror and satire.

A Mountain Walked is chock-full of stories old and new that highlight the endless variations that can be played on H. P. Lovecraft s signature creation.

S. T. Joshi is the leading authority on H. P. Lovecraft. He is the author of I Am Providence: The Life and Times of H. P. Lovecraft and the editor of the Black Wings series of Lovecraftian fiction. He edits the Lovecraft Annual and the Weird Fiction Review.

Price: $17.69

    3 Comments

    1. 4 of 4 people found the following review helpful

      4.0 out of 5 stars
      but it is an excellent collection of good material, February 17, 2016

      By Kindle reader

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      This review is from: A Mountain Walked (Kindle Edition)

      I read a lot of Mythos material so I recognized a couple of the stories, but it is an excellent collection of good material. One of the better groupings I have read in many years.

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    2. 8 of 9 people found the following review helpful

      5.0 out of 5 stars
      This is one of the best anthologies I can recall, January 1, 2016

      By DJ (eastern seaboard) –

      Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

      This review is from: A Mountain Walked (Kindle Edition)

      I have the kindle version. Since 1970, I’ve been reading works in the Lovecraft mythos. This is one of the best anthologies I can recall. I rarely reread a book but I will for some of the stories in ‘A Mountain Walked’ just to again enjoy the thrill of strangeness and something truly alien.

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    3. 74 of 83 people found the following review helpful

      4.0 out of 5 stars
      Review of the Print and Kindle Copies of A Mountain Walked (As Compared to the Centipede Press Hardback), December 6, 2015

      By Anthony Rodriguez

      Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

      This review is from: A Mountain Walked (Paperback)

      So, to start, this is NOT a review of the content of A Mountain Walked. Not because it’s irrelevant, simply because I believe A Mountain Walked will ultimately be placed alongside the great horror/weird anthologies of the 20th and 21st Century right along with Wise and Fraser’s “Great Tales of Terror and the Supernatural; Hartwell’s The Dark Descent/Foundations of Fear; and the Vandermer’s The Weird. I would say it is the finest Lovecraft Anthology that has ever been assembled. Period. And this is among a STRONG group of contenders such as Lockhart’s Book of Cthulhu 1 and 2, the Black Wings series, Dead but Dreaming, and even the original one Arkham House’s Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos and New Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos. In terms of both content and presentation it flat out beats every other. Centipede did a phenomenal job among an already impressive publishing oeuvre. So, the review of the anthology is simple to me. Some of the stories (e.g., Ligotti’s Last Feast of the Harlequin) are repeats, some (e.g., Kiernan’s John Four) are original. All are outstanding.

      So what is the difference between the Centipede Hardback, the Dark Regions Softcover, and the Dark Regions Kindle? And which one should I buy (i.e., what’s worth the cost)? I bought all 3. The Hardback is now desperately out of print and I hope Centipede publishes a second edition hardback so more people can have it. So you really are between the softcover and the kindle. So, cliff notes version, go for the Kindle.

      Now I’ll explain why. The Softcover and the Kindle share identical features with ONE big exception, which I’ll go into below. So, the comparison is between Centipede Hardback vs. Dark Regions Softcover and Kindle. Here’s the longer version.
      The following are NOT in the Dark Regions editions:
      Laird Barron’s story “Man With No Name”
      TC Boyle’s story “Thirteen Hundred Rats”
      Denis Tiani’s story “Rupa Worms From Outer Space”
      The 2 HPL Illustrated Stories (Pickman’s Model and The Lurking Fear)
      And . . . ALL the art portfolios 🙁 🙁 🙁
      I kinda expected this, would have exponentially increased cost. Now, in the Softcover there are black and white reprints of some of the pictures from the Art Portfolios but really the only true color reproduction you get is the outside cover. Everything else is in black and white and if this was a picture of Michelangelo’s paintings that might work but the art in A Mountain Walked is obviously given to darker color palates, not lighter, thus making the black and white reproductions come out very badly (the worst offender comes right before Caitlin Kiernan’s “John Four”). But! The Kindle edition has the exact same pictures as the Softcover edition but they are in color (as God or The Great Old Ones intended) and you can zoom in on them. Ergo, my preference for the Kindle.

      This is why the Dark Regions Edition lost a star though because the artwork was incredible and I might have given them a pass if they’d left the HPL illustrated editions (even in the bad black and white) AND Drazen Kozjan’s graphic novel-esque story “Excerpts From A Notebook” (it was a good one). Also, the Softcover is still a little pricey and the Kindle, as of my last looking, is $5 bucks. One interesting thing I found out is that if you purchase the Softcover copy first and you have Amazon Prime, you qualify for something called “Matchbook Kindle”. You may all know about this but it was new to me. Point being it knocked off $3 bucks from the Kindle so I got the Kindle version too for just $2 bucks. Nice! This is not to say I’m knocking the Softcover. I don’t regret buying mine because I’m the kind of reader who likes to mark up his books and there’s no way I’m marking the Hardcover version. I’m honestly afraid to touch it with my bare fingers (like what if I have cheeto stains and it rubs off? I know I ate those cheetos two days ago but there could be residue! I don’t know how cheeto residue works!!!) and I am also a reader who likes to hold paper, little Old School that way. So, Softcover isn’t bad, just if your mission is to read the stories and see the artwork that was left in, Kindle would be a good option.

      Now, you hear me complaining about the art work being messed up by the black and white transfer (although I said they would have increase price if it was in color which sounds like I’m contradicting myself and I am, because who ever said I had to be consistent? I drink coffee at like 9pm then complain when I can’t go to sleep; that’s the kind of guy whose advice you’re taking.) BUT what keeps the Dark Regions version at a solid 4 stars is that they apparently added a story. If I missed it (for anyone out there who also has the Centipede Hardcover) please correct me but I looked at the table of contents for the Centipede version with a fine tooth comb and couldn’t find Jason…

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